POLING is grateful for the MEDICAL and MANDATORY personnel on the front lines of the COVID pandemic.

In an effort to do our part, we have developed a task force to share up-to-date information with our clients and those on the front lines.



The Latest COVID-19 Statistics

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COVID-19 Resources

POLING has gathered numerous resources to aid our clients weather the storm of this pandemic. As we receive updates on this constantly-changing phenomenon, POLING will update this page with relevant information and tools. If you need information you can’t find below, please contact us anytime.

Returning To Work

  • POLING is happy to present this useful checklist that will help you understand what it takes to keep you, your employees and your clients safe.

Guidance for Nursing Homes

Medical Malpractice Defense

  • Click here for a guide to COVID-related legislation and its impacts on the prosecution of existing cases.

Dental Claims

  • Dentistry has one of the highest risks of exposure to COVID-19.  As the dental workforce begins to return to practice, make sure your office is aware of the guidelines issued by the Ohio State Dental Board for providing dental care during the COVID-19 pandemic, which includes recommendations for recording body temperatures and a pre-procedure mouth rinse.
  • Practicing dentistry during the COVID-19 pandemic may present new challenges to adhere to ethics and professional conduct requirements.  The American Dental Association has published helpful guidance to help dentists navigate these circumstances, which you can find here.

Workers’ Compensation Guidance

  • Click here for our analysis of COVID-19’s effects on worker’s compensation.

Legal Profession

Airline Issues & Travel Restrictions

The airline industry was one of the first to be wracked by Covid-19, with many countries closing borders, restricting flights or screening for symptoms the few passengers willing to risk travel during the pandemic.  Many businesses severely curtailed employee travel, and the airlines were faced with masked personnel, drastically increased cleaning procedures, and equally drastic reduced seat capacity as they struggled to comply with frequently changing and sometimes conflicting advice from public health authorities.

The effect has been significant, and economic experts wonder when, or if, the aviation industry will recover.  Most airlines have grounded much of their fleet, airports have closed runways, taxiways at airline maintenance facilities are clogged with parked aircraft, and many employees have been idled.  While personnel layoffs have been largely suspended by the airlines’ acceptance of COVID-19 economic relief funding from the federal government, the protections are scheduled to lapse in the fall. One major US air carrier has indicated that up to 33% of its pilot ranks may be furloughed by October, with corresponding reductions among the ranks of maintenance personnel, ramp handlers and the myriad of other employees necessary to keep a complex airliner flying.

As with much of the current COVID-19 situation, the future for the airline industry remains uncertain.  Litigation over ticket refunds, exposure to the virus, cancelled flights and employment-related legal action is expected to increase in the coming months.